Posted by: columbiahighlands | February 3, 2011

Google Earth Tour of the Columbia Highlands Makes Case for Wilderness

In northeastern Washington, the Columbia River enters from British Columbia and cuts a gateway through two subranges of the Rocky Mountains, the Kettle River Range and Selkirk Mountains. This wild landscape, from the granite ridges and open park lands of shrub-steppe and old-growth pines in the west, to the lush, cedar-filled canyons and creek bottoms farther east, is called the Columbia Highlands. For those not fortunate enough to live here or to have visited northeast Washington’s small towns and scenic mountains, there’s a new video that will take you on a guided Google Earth and stunning photo tour of this exceptionally beautiful, uncrowded Northwest gem. 

The Columbia Highlands still holds the mystique of the American West: wild lands team with abundant and diverse wildlife, family-owned timber mills provide local jobs and wood products, and historic ranches dot the landscape. It is home to grizzly bear, moose, elk, caribou and the Canada lynx among other wildlife. The 15-minute video, “Columbia Highlands: Washington’s Last Wilderness Frontier,” was put together by local conservation groups Conservation Northwest and The Lands Council to draw greater attention to their wilderness and working lands protection plan, the Columbia Highlands Initiative, and make the case that the rural, wild character of the region cannot be taken for granted if we want to pass our way of life and wildlife heritage on to future generations.

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